Crabgrass Frontier

Crabgrass Frontier PDF
Author: Kenneth T. Jackson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195049831
Size: 29.70 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 396
View: 2155

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Traces the development of American suburbs, suggests reasons for their growth, compares American residential patterns with those of Europe and Japan, and looks at future trends

Century Of The Leisured Masses

Century of the Leisured Masses PDF
Author: David George Surdam
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0190211571
Size: 54.94 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Business & Economics
Languages : en
Pages : 336
View: 1064

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American living standards improved considerably between 1900 and 2000. While most observers focus on gains in per-capita income as a measure of economic well-being, economists have used other measures of well-being: height, weight, and longevity. The increased amount of leisure time per week and across people's lifetimes, however, has been an unsung aspect of the improved standard of living in America. In Century of the Leisured Masses, David George Surdam explores the growing presence of leisure activities in Americans' lives and how this development came out throughout the twentieth century. Most Americans have gone from working fifty-five or more hours per week to working fewer than forty, although many Americans at the top rungs of the economic ladder continue to work long hours. Not only do more Americans have more time to devote to other activities, they are able to enjoy higher-quality leisure. New forms of leisure have given Americans more choices, better quality, and greater convenience. For instance, in addition to producing music themselves, they can now listen to the most talented musicians when and where they want. Television began as black and white on small screens; within fifty years, Americans had a cast of dozens of channels to choose from. They could also purchase favorite shows and movies to watch at their convenience. Even Americans with low incomes enjoyed television and other new forms of leisure. This growth of leisure resulted from a combination of growing productivity, better health, and technology. American workers became more productive and chose to spend their improved productivity and higher wages by consuming more, taking more time off, and enjoying better working conditions. By century's end, relatively few Americans were engaged in arduous, dangerous, and stultifying occupations. The reign of tyranny on the shop floor, in retail shops, and in offices was mitigated; many Americans could even enjoy leisure activities during work hours. Failure to consider the gains in leisure time and leisure consumption understates the gains in American living standards. With Century of the Leisured Masses, Surdam has comprehensively documented and examined the developments in this important marker of well-being throughout the past century.

The Urban Geography Reader

The Urban Geography Reader PDF
Author: NICK FYFE
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 042960386X
Size: 71.90 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 424
View: 4579

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Drawing on a rich diversity of theoretical approaches and analytical strategies, urban geographers have been at the forefront of understanding the global and local processes shaping cities, and of making sense of the urban experiences of a wide variety of social groups. Through their links with those working in the fields of urban policy design, urban geographers have also played an important role in the analysis of the economic and social problems confronting cities. Capturing the diversity of scholarship in the field of urban geography, this reader presents a stimulating selection of articles and excerpts by leading figures. Organized around seven themes, it addresses the changing economic, social, cultural, and technological conditions of contemporary urbanization and the range of personal and public responses. It reflects the academic importance of urban geography in terms of both its theoretical and empirical analysis as well as its applied policy relevance, and features extensive editorial input in the form of general, section and individual extract introductions. Bringing together in one volume 'classic' and contemporary pieces of urban geography, studies undertaken in the developed and developing worlds, and examples of theoretical and applied research, it provides in a convenient, student-friendly format, an unparalleled resource for those studying the complex geographies of urban areas.

Promised Land

Promised Land PDF
Author: David Stebenne
Publisher: Scribner
ISBN: 1982102705
Size: 28.86 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 336
View: 2315

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A timely work of groundbreaking history explains how the American middle class ballooned at mid-century until it dominated the nation, showing who benefited and what brought the expansion to an end. In Promised Land, David Stebenne examines the extraordinary revival of the middle class in mid-twentieth century America and how it drastically changed the country. The story begins with the pervasive income and wealth inequality of the pre-New Deal period. What followed—Roosevelt’s reforms, the regulation of business and finance, higher taxation of the truly affluent, and greater government spending—began a great leveling. World War II brought the military draft and the GI Bill, similarly transformative elements that also helped expand the middle class. For decades, economic policies and cultural practices strengthened the trend, and by the 1960s the middle class dictated American tastes from books to TV shows to housing to food, creating a powerful political constituency with shared interests and ideals. The disruptive events of 1968, however, signaled the end of this headlong expansion. The cultural clashes and political protests of that era turned a spotlight on how the policies and practices of the middle-class era had privileged white men over women, people of color, and other marginalized groups, as well as economic growth over environmental protection. These conflicts, along with shifts in policy and economic stagnation, started shrinking that vast middle class and challenging its values, trends that continue to the present day. Now, as the so-called “end of the middle class” dominates the news cycle and politicians talk endlessly about how to revive it, Stebenne’s vivid history of a social revolution that produced a new and influential way of life reveals the fascinating story of how it was achieved and the considerable costs incurred along the way. In the form of a revealing history, Promised Land shines more than a little light on our possible future.

Hooked On Growth

Hooked on Growth PDF
Author: Douglas E. Booth
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742527188
Size: 12.25 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Business & Economics
Languages : en
Pages : 277
View: 3903

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This accessible and provocative book explores whether getting 'unhooked' from economic growth to meet the needs of the environment is possible. Although giving the environment priority over growth may seem radical, the author argues that it can be accomplished using marketable emissions allowances, transferable development rights, and other tools popular with conventional economists. It can also be achieved by creating more interesting and environmentally friendly urban landscapes less beholden to the automobile. The key problem will be ensuring that everyone who wants employment can find it. This will require a transition to a shorter workweek, the wistful goal of many a harried worker. More leisure, a higher-quality environment, and more attractive cities and towns are the potential rewards of a less consumption-oriented society. Yet how can the power of special interests be overcome in the name of environmental conservation? This is the author's critical final question as he offers a clear path to a sustainable economic and environmental future.

Los Angeles And The Automobile

Los Angeles and the Automobile PDF
Author: Scott L. Bottles
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520911130
Size: 80.11 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 315
View: 735

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More comprehensive than any other book on this topic, Los Angeles and the Automobile places the evolution of Los Angeles within the context of American political and urban history.

Colored Property

Colored Property PDF
Author: David M. P. Freund
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226262774
Size: 44.23 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 526
View: 6780

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Northern whites in the post–World War II era began to support the principle of civil rights, so why did many of them continue to oppose racial integration in their communities? Challenging conventional wisdom about the growth, prosperity, and racial exclusivity of American suburbs, David M. P. Freund argues that previous attempts to answer this question have overlooked a change in the racial thinking of whites and the role of suburban politics in effecting this change. In Colored Property, he shows how federal intervention spurred a dramatic shift in the language and logic of residential exclusion—away from invocations of a mythical racial hierarchy and toward talk of markets, property, and citizenship. Freund begins his exploration by tracing the emergence of a powerful public-private alliance that facilitated postwar suburban growth across the nation with federal programs that significantly favored whites. Then, showing how this national story played out in metropolitan Detroit, he visits zoning board and city council meetings, details the efforts of neighborhood “property improvement” associations, and reconstructs battles over race and housing to demonstrate how whites learned to view discrimination not as an act of racism but as a legitimate response to the needs of the market. Illuminating government’s powerful yet still-hidden role in the segregation of U.S. cities, Colored Property presents a dramatic new vision of metropolitan growth, segregation, and white identity in modern America.

Homeward Bound

Homeward Bound PDF
Author: Elaine Tyler May
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0786723467
Size: 72.57 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 320
View: 7337

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In the 1950s, the term "containment" referred to the foreign policy-driven containment of Communism and atomic proliferation. Yet in Homeward Bound May demonstrates that there was also a domestic version of containment where the "sphere of influence" was the home. Within its walls, potentially dangerous social forces might be tamed, securing the fulfilling life to which postwar women and men aspired. Homeward Bound tells the story of domestic containment - how it emerged, how it affected the lives of those who tried to conform to it, and how it unraveled in the wake of the Vietnam era's assault on Cold War culture, when unwed mothers, feminists, and "secular humanists" became the new "enemy." This revised and updated edition includes the latest information on race, the culture wars, and current cultural and political controversies of the post-Cold War era.

Car Country

Car Country PDF
Author: Christopher W. Wells
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295804475
Size: 14.57 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : Transportation
Languages : en
Pages : 464
View: 6475

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For most people in the United States, going almost anywhere begins with reaching for the car keys. This is true, Christopher Wells argues, because the United States is Car Country�a nation dominated by landscapes that are difficult, inconvenient, and often unsafe to navigate by those who are not sitting behind the wheel of a car. The prevalence of car-dependent landscapes seems perfectly natural to us today, but it is, in fact, a relatively new historical development. In Car Country, Wells rejects the idea that the nation's automotive status quo can be explained as a simple byproduct of an ardent love affair with the automobile. Instead, he takes readers on a tour of the evolving American landscape, charting the ways that transportation policies and land-use practices have combined to reshape nearly every element of the built environment around the easy movement of automobiles. Wells untangles the complicated relationships between automobiles and the environment, allowing readers to see the everyday world in a completely new way. The result is a history that is essential for understanding American transportation and land-use issues today. Watch the book trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=48LTKOxxrXQ

Redesigning The American Lawn

Redesigning the American Lawn PDF
Author: F. Herbert Bormann
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300086942
Size: 28.70 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Gardening
Languages : en
Pages : 178
View: 7139

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This new edition, which is being reissued in a more artistic format and with many additional illustrations, updates the original text and adds a chapter showing what progress has been made in the ecological management of landscapes over the past decade."--BOOK JACKET.

The Ethics Of Metropolitan Growth

The Ethics of Metropolitan Growth PDF
Author: Robert Kirkman
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1441130713
Size: 20.37 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Philosophy
Languages : en
Pages : 192
View: 5972

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The Ethics of Metropolitan Growth is about the decisions people make that shape the built environment, from the everyday concerns of homeowners and commuters to grand gestures of national policy. Decisions about the built environment have taken on a particular urgency in recent months. The financial crisis that began in the home mortgage system, the instability of fuel prices, and long-term projections of oil depletion and climate change are now intertwined with more conventional concerns about metropolitan growth, such as traffic flow and air quality. Now, it would seem, is an excellent time for clear thinking about what the built environment can and should become in the future. Robert Kirkman argues that decisions about how to configure and live within the built environment have ethical dimensions that are sometimes hard to see, questions relating to well-being, justice, and sustainability. This book provides practical guidance for sorting through the ethical implications surrounding metropolitan growth, bringing the most immediate concerns of ordinary people to the centre of environmental ethics.

Dreaming Suburbia

Dreaming Suburbia PDF
Author: Amy Maria Kenyon
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 0814339131
Size: 37.71 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 224
View: 155

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Dreaming Suburbia is a cultural and historical interpretation of the political economy of postwar American suburbanization. Questions of race, class, and gender are explored through novels, film, television and social criticism where suburbia features as a central theme. Although suburbanization had important implications for cities and for the geo-politics of race, critical considerations of race and urban culture often receive insufficient attention in cultural studies of suburbia. This book puts these questions back in the frame by focusing on Detroit, Dearborn and Ford history, and the local suburbs of Inkster and Garden City. Covering such topics as the political and cultural economy of suburban sprawl, the interdependence of city and suburb, and local acts of violence and crises during the 1967 riots, the text examines the making of a physical place, its cultural effects and social exclusions. The perspectives of cultural history, American studies, social science, and urban studies give Dreaming Suburbia an interdisciplinary appeal.

Fast Food Nation

Fast Food Nation PDF
Author: Eric Schlosser
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780395977897
Size: 41.93 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Business & Economics
Languages : en
Pages : 356
View: 7364

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A journalist explores the homogenization of American culture and the impact of the fast food industry on modern-day health, economy, politics, popular culture, entertainment, and food production.

Pavements In The Garden

Pavements in the Garden PDF
Author: Ann Marie T. Cammarota
Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press
ISBN: 9780838638811
Size: 41.28 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 276
View: 4456

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Although it focuses on the local nature of the development, it draws comparisons to the similarities and differences of other locales across the country, and stresses the primary significance of new methods of transportation to suburban expansion.".

Dead End

Dead End PDF
Author: Benjamin Ross
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199360146
Size: 38.30 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 249
View: 2334

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"A witty, readable, and highly original tour through the history of America's suburbs and cities to uncover the human impulses that keep sprawl spreading"-- Provided by publisher.